Rants About Nothing
    23, 4月 2014 74 notes
  1. thebisweptualbisexual:

    I don’t even want to begin on Avril Lavigne but for me one of the creepy parts of that entire video—bc let’s be real the entire thing sucked—was the deadpan look on the her backup dancers’ faces like there’s literally no emotion in them and it’s like do you want Japanese/East Asian women to literally be your lifesize dolls who can’t change their faces very much like I can tell you don’t see them/us as people but seriously, fucking hell.

    Yeah, this is definitely what stuck out to me most with all the problematic aspects of that video. The whole “I’m gonna turn my Asian backup dancers into dolls” thing was super creepy and really gross. Yet so many people are defending this video as “fun” and “cute.” Fetishizing real people isn’t fun or cute, everybody.

  2. 21, 4月 2014 14614 notes
  3. (出典: vasyavzdroihev)

  4. 28, 2月 2014 86885 notes
  5. "If anyone slaps you on the right cheek, turn to them the other cheek also"
    Matt 5:39

    This specifically refers to a hand striking the side of a person’s face, tells quite a different story when placed in it’s proper historical context. In Jesus’s time, striking someone of a lower class ( a servant) with the back of the hand was used to assert authority and dominance. If the persecuted person “turned the other cheek,” the discipliner was faced with a dilemma. The left hand was used for unclean purposes, so a back-hand strike on the opposite cheek would not be performed. Another alternative would be a slap with the open hand as a challenge or to punch the person, but this was seen as a statement of equality. Thus, by turning the other cheek the persecuted was in effect putting an end to the behavior or if the slapping continued the person would lawfully be deemed equal and have to be released as a servant/slave.   

    (via thefullnessofthefaith)

    THAT makes a lot more sense, now, thank you. 

    (via guardianrock)

    I can attest to the original poster’s comments. A few years back I took an intensive seminar on faith-based progressive activism, and we spent an entire unit discussing how many of Jesus’ instructions and stories were performative protests designed to shed light on and ridicule the oppressions of that time period as a way to emphasize the absurdity of the social hierarchy and give people the will and motivation to make changes for a more free and equal society.

    For example, the next verse (Matthew 5:40) states “And if anyone wants to sue you and take your shirt, hand over your coat as well.” In that time period, men traditionally wore a shirt and a coat-like garment as their daily wear. To sue someone for their shirt was to put them in their place - suing was generally only performed to take care of outstanding debts, and to be sued for one’s shirt meant that the person was so destitute the only valuable thing they could repay with was their own clothing. However, many cultures at that time (including Hebrew peoples) had prohibitions bordering on taboo against public nudity, so for a sued man to surrender both his shirt and his coat was to turn the system on its head and symbolically state, in a very public forum, that “I have no money with which to repay this person, but they are so insistent on taking advantage of my poverty that I am leaving this hearing buck-ass naked. His greed is the cause of a shameful public spectacle.”

    All of a sudden an action of power (suing someone for their shirt) becomes a powerful symbol of subversion and mockery, as the suing patron either accepts the coat (and therefore full responsibility as the cause of the other man’s shameful display) or desperately chases the protester around trying to return his clothes to him, making a fool of himself in front of his peers and the entire gathered community.

    Additionally, the next verse (Matthew 5:41; “If anyone forces you to go one mile, go with them two miles.”) was a big middle finger to the Romans who had taken over Judea and were not seen as legitimate authority by the majority of the population there. Roman law stated that a centurion on the march could require a Jew (and possibly other civilians as well, although I don’t remember explicitly) to carry his pack at any time and for any reason for one mile along the road (and because of the importance of the Roman highway system in maintaining rule over the expansive empire, the roads tended to be very well ordered and marked), however hecould not require any service beyond the next mile marker. For a Jewish civilian to carry a centurion’s pack for an entire second mile was a way to subvert the authority of the occupying forces. If the civilian wouldn’t give the pack back at the end of the first mile, the centurion would either have to forcibly take it back or report the civilian to his commanding officer (both of which would result in discipline being taken against the soldier for breaking Roman law) or wait until the civilian volunteered to return the pack, giving the Judean native implicit power over the occupying Roman and completely subverting the power structure of the Empire. Can you imagine how demoralizing that must have been for the highly ordered Roman armies that patrolled the region?

    Jesus was a pacifist, but his teachings were in no way passive. There’s a reason he was practically considered a terrorist by the reigning powers, and it wasn’t because he healed the sick and fed the hungry.

    (via central-avenue)

     yo i like thisi would like to know more about thiswhere does one learn more about this seconded like whoa

    (via wanderingoff)

    JESUS JUST GOT SO MUCH MORE BADASS REMEMBER THIS NEXT TIME SOME WHITE CHRISTIAN TELLS YOU TO BE NICE “LIKE CHRIST” REMEMBER THEY’RE ASKING YOU TO BE LIKE THE MIDDLE EASTERN JEW WHO IS TELLING YOU TO BE PASSIVE AGGRESSIVE.

    AGGRESSIVE 

    (via cherrypieboy)

    Yes. People who try to make out like Jesus wants you to sit there and take it really irk me.

  6. 28, 2月 2014 417 notes
  7. lolfactory:

You had me at mini flaming crossbow
- tumblr pictures
- lol rofl wtf pics


I need to make this

    lolfactory:

    You had me at mini flaming crossbow

    - tumblr pictures

    I need to make this

  8. 28, 2月 2014 73031 notes
  9. tramampoline:

thesoftestbunny:

aravenhairedmaiden:

strangeasanjles:

boygeorgemichaelbluth:

youcantroamwithoutcaesar:

blackberryshawty:

chokesngags:

THANK YOU

How is her name ghetto tho? It’s literally a variation on her mother’s side of the family’s surname Beyince. Not to mention the problematic fuckshit with shaming black people for having names that are different. Basically, bye.

There’s really no reason to explain why it’s not ghetto because there’s no such thing as a ghetto name.

i thought whiteys liked french stuff

My name is Angelique, which is french, but I’ve been harassed about it being ‘ghetto’ my whole life.  It’s not because it’s different, it’s because the name belongs to a Black body.  White people can name their child wild, meaningless shit like Pilot Inspektor, Apple, Dweezil, and Moon Unit, but that’s considered creative and quirky…yet common Black names such as Lakeisha and Shaniqua, which have meanings such as “she who lives” and “god is gracious”, are considered ghetto [and therefore worthy of ridicule].  I’m sick and goddamn tired of it.

I’m here for all of the commentary

When people think that “ghetto names” are just syllables put together and can’t comprehend that maybe the names come from or are variations of names from other languages.

also how dare the writer of this tweet assign their racist bullshit to tina belcher

Seriously why can’t we just lay off people’s names though

    tramampoline:

    thesoftestbunny:

    aravenhairedmaiden:

    strangeasanjles:

    boygeorgemichaelbluth:

    youcantroamwithoutcaesar:

    blackberryshawty:

    chokesngags:

    THANK YOU

    How is her name ghetto tho? It’s literally a variation on her mother’s side of the family’s surname Beyince. Not to mention the problematic fuckshit with shaming black people for having names that are different. Basically, bye.

    There’s really no reason to explain why it’s not ghetto because there’s no such thing as a ghetto name.

    i thought whiteys liked french stuff

    My name is Angelique, which is french, but I’ve been harassed about it being ‘ghetto’ my whole life.  It’s not because it’s different, it’s because the name belongs to a Black body.  White people can name their child wild, meaningless shit like Pilot Inspektor, Apple, Dweezil, and Moon Unit, but that’s considered creative and quirky…yet common Black names such as Lakeisha and Shaniqua, which have meanings such as “she who lives” and “god is gracious”, are considered ghetto [and therefore worthy of ridicule].  I’m sick and goddamn tired of it.

    I’m here for all of the commentary

    When people think that “ghetto names” are just syllables put together and can’t comprehend that maybe the names come from or are variations of names from other languages.

    also how dare the writer of this tweet assign their racist bullshit to tina belcher

    Seriously why can’t we just lay off people’s names though

    (出典: ma-karena)

  10. Source: itsvondell
    28, 2月 2014 194 notes
  11. lickystickypickyshe:

Marian Anderson, one of the most talented contraltos of the twentieth century, was born on this day in 1897. She became a figure in civil rights when in 1939, the Daughters of the American Revolution refused to let her sing to an integrated audience in Constitutional Hall. 
With the help of First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt and her husband, she instead performed in front of 75,000 people on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial. Anderson also broke barriers when she became the first black person to perform at the Metropolitan Opera in 1955. She’s been awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the National Medal of Arts and a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award.

    lickystickypickyshe:

    Marian Anderson, one of the most talented contraltos of the twentieth century, was born on this day in 1897. She became a figure in civil rights when in 1939, the Daughters of the American Revolution refused to let her sing to an integrated audience in Constitutional Hall.

    With the help of First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt and her husband, she instead performed in front of 75,000 people on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial. Anderson also broke barriers when she became the first black person to perform at the Metropolitan Opera in 1955. She’s been awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the National Medal of Arts and a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award.

  12. 28, 2月 2014 238 notes
  13. http://likespoliticsandprettythings.tumblr.com/post/77983314416/cognitivedissonance-classysassyrepublican    »

    cognitivedissonance:

    patrioticintellect:

    cognitivedissonance:

    iammyfather:

    cognitivedissonance:

    classysassyrepublican:

    cognitivedissonance:

    classysassyrepublican:

    It’s sad to see how those who abuse the system to get welfare, food stamps, disability, etc. undermine the needs of those who really need it

    So instead of just being sad about it, did you report those who are abusing said resources?

    Here’s…

    Wow, rude much?

    If you think providing facts and asking if you’re reporting all these supposed welfare cheats is rude, then yes.

    If you see “All this abuse and cheating” and don’t report it, aren’t you guilty “After the Fact”?  If this corruption is occurring, report it, I’m calling you OUT.

    Bingo. If this is happening and you know about it, why aren’t you reporting it?

    Could it be because you’re still in high school like you said on your blog, and are just parroting what your folks have said? In that case, tell them to report all these welfare kings and queens. Y’know, unless they’re complicit in the fraud.

    Here’s an adult lesson for you: Facts aren’t rude just because you don’t like them. I could have shown you rude, but I gave you facts. One day, someone isn’t gonna be so generous, kiddo. Then you’ll see rude.

    Compared to the trillions you guys have spent on war in the past decade, VERY, VERY little money is cheated out of the system by welfare fraudsters. Right?

    Yeah, but this girl apparently knows people who cheat the system, and won’t report it, thereby giving those of us who actually need benefits a bad name. Unless she actually doesn’t know anyone and is just talking out her ass. That’s a possibility too.

    I’m tired of these anecdotal “my mother’s best friend’s sister’s cousin’s hairdresser’s son knows a woman with fifty bazillion kids and twenty Cadillacs and she’s on welfare”-type stories. Or the passive aggressive crap of “I’d support it if only people who really NEED-NEED it got it, not all these freeloaders.”

    No. Piss off. Put up or shut up. If these people really exist and you know about it, report it. Otherwise, shut up, stop talking out your ass, and get pissed about the corporate welfare cheats and war profiteers costing us way more than any welfare fraudster ever could in a lifetime.

  14. 28, 2月 2014 373368 notes
  15. http://dytabytes.tumblr.com/post/78150967019/thebiscuiteternal-verceri-sniperj0e »

    thebiscuiteternal:

    verceri:

    sniperj0e:

    sniperj0e:

    ok but what if like. werewolves transform under the full moon but theres just this one and by day hes a big tough guy and then when he transforms hes a tiny dog. just fucking. just fucking turns into the tiniest, fluffiest…

  16. Source: dytabytes
    28, 2月 2014 640 notes
  17. Woman with muscular dystrophy applies to be a fashion model as a joke, gets the job [5 pictures] »

    disabledpeoplearesexy:

    Congratulations to the beautiful Jillian Mercado (on Tumblr as jillypeppa and manufactured1987)!

  18. Source: girljanitor
    28, 2月 2014 1379 notes
  19. thepeoplesrecord:

Homeless folks have real solutions to the housing crisisFebruary 27, 2014
When Bill de Blasio took office on January 1, he inherited a broken, bloated and expensive homeless shelter system that cost almost $1 billion to operate in 2013. He also inherited neighborhoods dotted with vacant buildings and lots that represent both potential housing and jobs. For New York’s homeless, there is a Kafkaesque paradigm where so-called affordable housing is in fact unaffordable due to the federal government’s Area Median Income guidelines.
Those who can’t afford housing are the same unemployed, or low-wage workers, seniors, disabled and just poor New Yorkers in the shelter system. On bitterly cold nights this winter, the shelter-industrial complex housed more than 50,000 adults and children — enough to fill Yankee Stadium. That didn’t include those using the domestic violence shelter system and the untold numbers of homeless folks sleeping in churches, mosques and synagogues. Nor does it include the thousands sleeping in trains, public transit facilities or parks. It doesn’t include the hundreds of thousands doubled or tripled up with friends and family hoping for a break so that they don’t have to go into the shelter system.
Real Roots of the Problem
Homelessness has been framed as the result of individual dysfunction and pathology. “Oh, they’re mentally ill, or they need to get a job,” — this mantra has been repeated by politicians and media for two decades. Picture the Homeless encourages the de Blasio administration to look at the big picture, to take into account rising rents and stagnant incomes at the bottom of the wage scale. Forces like gentrification, property warehousing and disinvestment in effective housing programs such as Section 8 have led us to where we are today.
The bottom-line cause of homelessness is the high cost of housing. Real estate development here has been geared to business interests, hotels and high rises, offices and office towers. When there is new housing construction, it’s for the super rich. Banks and landlords keep buildings empty while they wait for neighborhoods to gentrify, and to get rid of protections on rent-stabilized apartments.
Mayor Michael Bloomberg took away the homeless priority for permanent housing solutions like Section 8 and public housing, replacing them with time-limited rental subsidy programs (first Housing Stability Plus and then the Advantage programs) that were doomed from the start.
Past administrations have cried poverty when asked why they don’t prioritize housing for homeless people, but that’s a lie. The money’s there, it’s just being wasted on a politically connected shelter-industrial complex. A billion dollars a year could house a lot of people. Most shelters get two to three times as much money per month for each homeless household as it would cost to pay their rent.
In 2011, we partnered with the Hunter College Center for Community Planning and Development to devise and execute a replicable methodology for how the city could conduct a vacant property census. We found enough empty buildings and lots to house up to 200,000 people, and that was just in one-third of the city. But the city doesn’t keep track of vacant property and the little bit of money that is out there is being used to house people in shelters.
Every homeless person is different, and it’s true that mental illness and substance abuse play a role in some people losing their housing, but plenty of very wealthy people have issues of substance abuse or mental illness. The root issue is poverty. Public policy needs to address the systemic causes of homelessness. No mayor or president can implement a policy to stop people from having mental illness or losing their jobs, but they can make it so that everyone can afford housing.
There are numerous factors that contribute to record levels of homelessness, like how people coming home from jail with a record are excluded from housing, so there’s nowhere for them to go. Banks are still redlining in certain communities. Institutional racism is also a huge problem — over 90 percent of homeless families in shelters are African-American and/or Latino. Predatory lending has been targeting people of color. Ninety-nine percent of the people who go into housing court get no legal representation, so many of them end up losing their homes.
There’s no cohesive overall plan between government agencies that serve low-income people, and that adds up to a lot of resources being wasted. There’s no unity or collaboration between housing courts and the welfare and shelter systems. HRA, DHS, NYPD — it’s a whole lot of alphabet soup that doesn’t add up to anything.
People say homeless people should go get jobs — but people have jobs! The pay just doesn’t match the rental market. Very low wages, including social security and other income forms for folks who aren’t working, plus inadequate income supports, plus high rents, equal homelessness. It’s simple math.
Making Demands
At Picture the Homeless, we don’t just complain about problems. Homeless people know what’s not working, and they know what needs to change. That’s why our organizing campaigns have concrete policy demands of the new administration.
For starters, it’s unacceptable that the city has no idea how much property is currently vacant. We have to have conduct an annual citywide count of vacant buildings and lots, so we know what kind of resources are out there to develop new housing — and who’s keeping housing off the market. Legislation that would empower the city to do such a count was stalled for three years in the City Council under Christine Quinn. We were heartened to see it identified as a necessary solution on Bill de Blasio’s campaign website, as well as a priority for the City Council’s Progressive Caucus.
The new administration could immediately utilize a small portion of the Department of Homeless Services’ (DHS) shelter budget (even just 1 percent would be almost $10 million!) and create permanent rental subsidies so homeless people can get out of shelters. That funding could also support a pilot project for innovative housing models like community land trusts, which have the potential to create permanently-affordable, democratically-controlled housing for folks at all income levels, as well as supporting small businesses and incubating jobs that pay a living wage.
The city should take all the property whose owners owe taxes on water or violations, and put it into a land bank and develop it for those who really need it. Property that the city acquires through the Third Party Transfer program should be prioritized for nonprofit housing developers, including community land trusts. And the city should create and expand community land trusts that will be permanently affordable to the people who live there.
The new administration could also limit what is considered “affordable housing” to the city of New York. Right now, “affordable housing” can go to folks making upwards of $80,000 a year, because it’s based on Area Median Income calculations that factor in affluent parts of Westchester and Long Island.
Full article

    thepeoplesrecord:

    Homeless folks have real solutions to the housing crisis
    February 27, 2014

    When Bill de Blasio took office on January 1, he inherited a broken, bloated and expensive homeless shelter system that cost almost $1 billion to operate in 2013. He also inherited neighborhoods dotted with vacant buildings and lots that represent both potential housing and jobs. For New York’s homeless, there is a Kafkaesque paradigm where so-called affordable housing is in fact unaffordable due to the federal government’s Area Median Income guidelines.

    Those who can’t afford housing are the same unemployed, or low-wage workers, seniors, disabled and just poor New Yorkers in the shelter system. On bitterly cold nights this winter, the shelter-industrial complex housed more than 50,000 adults and children — enough to fill Yankee Stadium. That didn’t include those using the domestic violence shelter system and the untold numbers of homeless folks sleeping in churches, mosques and synagogues. Nor does it include the thousands sleeping in trains, public transit facilities or parks. It doesn’t include the hundreds of thousands doubled or tripled up with friends and family hoping for a break so that they don’t have to go into the shelter system.

    Real Roots of the Problem

    Homelessness has been framed as the result of individual dysfunction and pathology. “Oh, they’re mentally ill, or they need to get a job,” — this mantra has been repeated by politicians and media for two decades. Picture the Homeless encourages the de Blasio administration to look at the big picture, to take into account rising rents and stagnant incomes at the bottom of the wage scale. Forces like gentrification, property warehousing and disinvestment in effective housing programs such as Section 8 have led us to where we are today.

    The bottom-line cause of homelessness is the high cost of housing. Real estate development here has been geared to business interests, hotels and high rises, offices and office towers. When there is new housing construction, it’s for the super rich. Banks and landlords keep buildings empty while they wait for neighborhoods to gentrify, and to get rid of protections on rent-stabilized apartments.

    Mayor Michael Bloomberg took away the homeless priority for permanent housing solutions like Section 8 and public housing, replacing them with time-limited rental subsidy programs (first Housing Stability Plus and then the Advantage programs) that were doomed from the start.

    Past administrations have cried poverty when asked why they don’t prioritize housing for homeless people, but that’s a lie. The money’s there, it’s just being wasted on a politically connected shelter-industrial complex. A billion dollars a year could house a lot of people. Most shelters get two to three times as much money per month for each homeless household as it would cost to pay their rent.

    In 2011, we partnered with the Hunter College Center for Community Planning and Development to devise and execute a replicable methodology for how the city could conduct a vacant property census. We found enough empty buildings and lots to house up to 200,000 people, and that was just in one-third of the city. But the city doesn’t keep track of vacant property and the little bit of money that is out there is being used to house people in shelters.

    Every homeless person is different, and it’s true that mental illness and substance abuse play a role in some people losing their housing, but plenty of very wealthy people have issues of substance abuse or mental illness. The root issue is poverty. Public policy needs to address the systemic causes of homelessness. No mayor or president can implement a policy to stop people from having mental illness or losing their jobs, but they can make it so that everyone can afford housing.

    There are numerous factors that contribute to record levels of homelessness, like how people coming home from jail with a record are excluded from housing, so there’s nowhere for them to go. Banks are still redlining in certain communities. Institutional racism is also a huge problem — over 90 percent of homeless families in shelters are African-American and/or Latino. Predatory lending has been targeting people of color. Ninety-nine percent of the people who go into housing court get no legal representation, so many of them end up losing their homes.

    There’s no cohesive overall plan between government agencies that serve low-income people, and that adds up to a lot of resources being wasted. There’s no unity or collaboration between housing courts and the welfare and shelter systems. HRA, DHS, NYPD — it’s a whole lot of alphabet soup that doesn’t add up to anything.

    People say homeless people should go get jobs — but people have jobs! The pay just doesn’t match the rental market. Very low wages, including social security and other income forms for folks who aren’t working, plus inadequate income supports, plus high rents, equal homelessness. It’s simple math.

    Making Demands

    At Picture the Homeless, we don’t just complain about problems. Homeless people know what’s not working, and they know what needs to change. That’s why our organizing campaigns have concrete policy demands of the new administration.

    For starters, it’s unacceptable that the city has no idea how much property is currently vacant. We have to have conduct an annual citywide count of vacant buildings and lots, so we know what kind of resources are out there to develop new housing — and who’s keeping housing off the market. Legislation that would empower the city to do such a count was stalled for three years in the City Council under Christine Quinn. We were heartened to see it identified as a necessary solution on Bill de Blasio’s campaign website, as well as a priority for the City Council’s Progressive Caucus.

    The new administration could immediately utilize a small portion of the Department of Homeless Services’ (DHS) shelter budget (even just 1 percent would be almost $10 million!) and create permanent rental subsidies so homeless people can get out of shelters. That funding could also support a pilot project for innovative housing models like community land trusts, which have the potential to create permanently-affordable, democratically-controlled housing for folks at all income levels, as well as supporting small businesses and incubating jobs that pay a living wage.

    The city should take all the property whose owners owe taxes on water or violations, and put it into a land bank and develop it for those who really need it. Property that the city acquires through the Third Party Transfer program should be prioritized for nonprofit housing developers, including community land trusts. And the city should create and expand community land trusts that will be permanently affordable to the people who live there.

    The new administration could also limit what is considered “affordable housing” to the city of New York. Right now, “affordable housing” can go to folks making upwards of $80,000 a year, because it’s based on Area Median Income calculations that factor in affluent parts of Westchester and Long Island.

    Full article

  20. 28, 2月 2014 464912 notes
  21. heylookitsliz:

    elizabeth-antoinette:

    ikenbot:

    freeselfdefense:

    Rape Escape

    • Easy and very effective
    • Requires nothing but your body
    • Includes attack

    Very useful to know, pass and share please.

    Worth watching

    I don’t mean to impose a personal favour on you guys, but I really would like to ask that everyone who follows me reblog this. 

    I don’t think I made it very clear but last month I was sexually assaulted by someone who I thought was my friend (I don’t want to talk about it don’t ask), and it’s… really fucked with my head. 

    Had I known this a month ago I would have been able to get away

    So, essentially, I’m really pleading with you to reblog this so everyone who follows you doesn’t get stuck in the same position I was with no way out. 

    I mean again I don’t want the point of this to be my sob story or whatever but if you could reblog this it would seriously mean a lot 

    (出典: )

  22. Source: dytabytes
    28, 2月 2014 34312 notes
  23. (出典: player-offline)

  24. Source: thatgirl120
    28, 2月 2014 149760 notes
  25. Yes more please I love that pie

    (出典: rosalarian)

  26. 28, 2月 2014 52279 notes
  27. nardzbarr:

    disturbingly-average:

    i will cosplay pretty ladies and i will cosplay scary men. i will cosplay scary ladies and i will cosplay pretty men. i will cosplay what i want and i will look fabulous.

    das rite. that is how you do it

    Hellllll yeah

  28. 28, 2月 2014 250 notes
  29. "What do you call someone who doesn't like the idea of abortion, but has no desire to impugn on others' rights? i.e "Don't like abortion? Fine, don't have one but don't try to impose your views on others""

    rabbleprochoice:

    stfueverything:

    pro-choice

    NO BUT REALLY

    The greatest success of the pro-life movement has been to confuse people about what it means to actually be pro-life and convince people that simply being uncomfortable with the idea of abortion fits the description.

    It does NOT.

    IT DOES NOT IT DOES NOT IT DOES NOT!!!

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